Visiting Denmark

Visa (short term)
If you wish to visit Denmark for a short period of time, you must obtain a visa prior to entry if you come from a country with a visa requirement for entering Denmark.

The purpose of applying a visa requirement to citizens of certain countries is to control who can enter and visit Denmark and the other Schengen countries. The Schengen countries normally decide cooperatively which nationalities the visa requirement will be applied to. The countries are selected with consideration to immigration and security issues, as well as political concerns.

A visa is only intended to allow a foreign national to visit Denmark and/or the other Schengen countries for a limited period of time. If you wish to reside in Denmark for an extended period of time, you need to apply for a residence permit. If the immigration authorities suspect that you intend to seek permanent or long-term residency in Denmark or another Schengen country without legal grounds, your visa application will be turned down. This applies for instance if you are applying for a residence permit and visa at the same time, or if you have a residence permit application pending with the Immigration Service.

If you have been granted certain types of residence or re-entry permits in another Schengen country, you do not need a visa to enter Denmark. Read more about residence permits issued by another Schengen country. These types of residence permits are not valid for entry into the Faroe Islands or Greenland.

If you hold certain types of residence permits issued by Bulgaria, Cyprus or Rumania you are permitted to travel through Denmark to the country that has issued the residence permit, but you may not stop over without reason. Your journey through Denmark may last no longer than five days.

You do not need a visa to enter Denmark if you hold a residence card issued under the EU regulations on free movement, and your residence card was issued by an EU country which is also a Schengen country. If you hold an EU residence card issued by an EU country which is not a Schengen country, you can enter Denmark without a visa only if you are accompanied by, or will join, an EU citizen. This applies to both residence cards issued in accordance with Directive 2004/38/EC and residence cards issued before this directive took effect. You will receive your residence card in the form of a plastic card the size of a credit card or a residence sticker placed in your passport.

Family members of an EU/EEA citizen or Swiss citizen who is exercising his/her right to free movement in Denmark, as well as family members of a Danish citizen who is exercising or who has exercised his/her right to free movement to relocate to another EU/EEA country or Switzerland, have the right to have a visa application processed in accordance with EU regulations. Read more about visas issued under EU regulations.

A decision to approve or reject a visa application is made in accordance with the guidelines set out in the Executive Order on Visas.

See: Executive Order No. 376 of 20 March 2015 on aliens’ access to Denmark on the basis of a visa

See also: Guideline No. 9188 of 20 March 2015 on aliens’ access to Denmark on the basis of a visa

What does a visa entitle you to?
A visa normally grants you the right to stay in the entire Schengen region. The Schengen countries are: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

A visa grants you the right to spend a maximum of 90 days in any 180-day period in the Schengen region.

If you remain in Denmark after your visa expires or if you attempt to use your visa stay to obtain permanent or long-term residency in Denmark, you can be given a penalty period of three or five years. During the penalty period you will not be able to obtain a visa to visit Denmark. Read more about misuse of a visa.

A visa does not allow you to work in Denmark unless the Immigration Service has explicitly granted you this right.

However, during visits of less than 90 days you may carry out certain work-related activities without holding a work permit. Read more about visa and work permit.

General conditions for granting a visa
You must normally meet the following basic conditions in order to be granted a visa:

Your passport or other form of valid travel document must be valid for three months past the visa expiration date. Moreover, the passport or travel document must have been issued within the past 10 years.

You must have the necessary means to pay for your stay and return trip. What will be considered as necessary funds will be determined by the Danish diplomatic mission and depends on the length of your stay, and whether you will stay at a hotel or with friends or family. As a general rule, you must have at your disposal approx. DKK 350 per day. A smaller amount may be accepted if you are staying in a private home and your host will cover all costs. If you are staying at a hotel, the amount must be greater, approx. DKK 500 per day.

You must hold a travel insurance policy to cover possible expenses in connection with a return for health reasons or death, indispensable medical treatment or acute hospitalisation during your stay. The insurance policy must cover all Schengen countries, and the minimum policy coverage is €30,000. The insurance policy must be valid for the same period as the visa. The validity of the visa may be shortened if the insurance policy does not cover the entire period.

You may not be registered as an undesirable in the Schengen Information System (SIS).
You may not have been deported from Denmark and given an entry ban.
You may not be listed on UN or EU sanction lists.

These conditions apply at the time your visa is issued, as well as when you enter and stay in the Schengen region. It is therefore important that you are able to document at all times that you have the necessary funds to pay for your stay and return trip, and that you hold a valid travel insurance policy. If you do not meet these conditions, your visa can be confiscated and revoked, in which case you will be required to leave the Schengen region immediately.

If the Immigration Service suspects that you intend to seek permanent or long-term residency in Denmark or another Schengen country, or that you may pose threat to national security or public safety, your visa application will be turned down.

If you remain in Denmark after your visa expires or if you attempt to use your visa stay to obtain permanent or long-term residency in Denmark, you can be given a penalty period of three or five years. Read more about misuse of a visa.